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Ted Wade, second row far right, and the rest of Bellarmine College's first basketball team

Featured News

Ted Wade: Pioneer of sport and science

Fall 2021

By Jonathan Saxon 

Louisville Courier-Journal 

Louisville is known for having its legends casually walk the streets, but what if someone told you Bellarmine's first Black basketball player walks beaches in Thailand? 

Ex-pat Theodore "Ted" Wade, 89, is a man of many talents who describes himself as a "retired gentleman of leisure" after a multi-decade career in the computer sciences field. 

"I've written five science fiction novels," Wade said in a Fourth of July video chat over Facebook. "I've been accused of thinking like (a) computer. I was on the leading edge of computer technology until my retirement in New York City. I worked for the Department of Defense for about 12 years" —1955-1962, according to his Facebook page. 

"He was certainly right there in the beginning," added Michael Wade, 66, Ted's oldest son, who is also retired and pursuing a degree in astrophysics at the University of Louisville. "Apparently, it's genetic because that's what I did my entire career." 

"He's never, ever accepted any limitations. We can all learn from that." -- Men's Coach Scott Davenport

Wade's been living in Thailand since 2015, following the passing of his second wife, Linda. He said living in the States without her was too much to bear, given the life and times they had carved out for themselves during their 56 years of marriage.  

"I couldn't walk the streets without having a memory," said Wade, as he recalled how he and Linda traveled everywhere together and created so many memories. "Walked here: We were here. She was a gambler, high roller. We went to all of the casinos, as far away as Las Vegas and as far east as Virginia. Every three months, we would go somewhere to a casino. After she died, I tried hard. But I can't do it. So I decided I just needed to get out of here. I went to Japan, and then to Thailand."  

'They protected me.' 

Before meeting Linda and traveling around the world, Wade was the first Black basketball player to play on a predominantly white college basketball team in Kentucky state history when he enrolled at Bellarmine University (then Bellarmine College) in 1950.  

"For me, it was a typical continuation of life," Wade said. "We all played basketball every day. I had a basketball court 50 yards from my house growing up. When Bellarmine opened, most were not athletically inclined or interested, but we had enough volunteers to form a team. I leaped at the opportunity. There was the problem of the new school not having a gymnasium. We had to borrow gym time from all of the Catholic schools around the community." 

While Wade says he doesn't recall anything on the court that was particularly impactful for him, he remembered that his teammates and coach never let the racist and prejudicial conditions of that era touch him. 

"Racism at the university? Zero," he said emphatically. "As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much. They wouldn't let that **** come in my face from the coach on down. They protected me 100 percent from the racism."  

He takes great pride in being part of the Pioneer Class at Bellarmine, the first group to attend classes when the college opened in 1950. While he was the only Black student in the class, he claims he never felt out of place at the school, in any context. He recalls an incident where an opposing coach suggested that he wasn't particularly welcome to play at his particular gym.  

"We played a college in Kentucky, and the coach said to our coach (Norb Raque), 'When you come down here, don't bring that n----- with you.' He said that to my coach. I wasn't aware of this at the time; I was told this after the fact. We went down there, and I played in the game." 

"Racism at the university? Zero. As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much."

Wade, who graduated from Central High School, also respected that Bellarmine kept its word regarding the promise made to students about the kind of education they would receive.  

"(The college) advertised, 'We do not teach you what to think, we teach you how to think," Wade said. "That impressed the hell out of me." 

Bellarmine men's basketball coach Scott Davenport hopes that people everywhere can learn from Wade's example. "He's never, ever accepted any limitations," Davenport said. "We can all learn from that." 

'Who is Admiral Miller?' 

While being the first Black student and basketball player in Bellarmine's history is noteworthy, so too is the story behind how Wade's outspoken candor and willingness to step up and speak out-landed him a job with the Olivetti Corporation of America. 

After receiving an honorable discharge from his service with the Air Force, Wade returned to Louisville to work for a now-defunct company called Louisville Medical Depot that was doing contract work for the Defense Department through the Defense Medical Supply Center. While working on one of the system's engineering projects, Wade noticed that the new programming instructions he received from an individual he identified as "Admiral Miller" could use some improvements.  

Wade expressed his concern with the new instructions and continued to implement his changes for two years before the disagreement with Admiral Miller came to a head. 

"They were sending down documentation for computer programming," he said. "And I'm reading through this stuff. I said, 'This is all [crap].' And I changed it for about two years. They interviewed me for about four days, and I really lost it near the end." 

Wade went back and forth with Admiral Miller for four days about why he kept adjusting programming instructions he was sent, even though Wade knew everything that one could know about programming languages at that point. On the fourth day, he let Admiral Miller know his true feelings. 

"I'm talking to this guy every day for about four or five days," he said. "And he kept saying, 'Admiral Miller says this….' And I said, 'Well, I'm looking at this [stuff]. I didn't do it, but I looked at it, and I did it better.' He said, 'Admiral Miller says this….' After about four days, I said, 'Who is Admiral Miller?' F--- Admiral Miller.'" 

The man leaned back and crossed his arms, Wade said, and said, "I'm Admiral Miller." 

"That day, I told my wife, 'I think I just lost my job,'" Wade said. 

But it turns out somebody respected the stand Wade took when it came to his work.  

"A week later [Olivetti] called down to Louisville," he said. "They said, 'We want you to come to New York City and do with [us] what you have done for the Department of Defense and Defense Medical Supply Center.' I said, 'I'll come, but you have to give me New York City money.'" 

Since then, Wade had used his Bellarmine education (he studied Business Administration while at Bellarmine before his college career was interrupted by service in the military during the Korean War; he also dabbled in Archaeology, Egyptology, History, and Cosmology) to come up with theories that he's discussed with scientists such as Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, the world-renowned astrophysicist, and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.  

One theory is called the Repetitive Big Bang Theory, Wade said. "I have actually talked to Dr. Tyson about it. He laughed at me and said, 'You can't prove it.' How do you prove something that takes 14 million years to happen? So I laugh about it."  

Now, Wade spends his days collecting the latest movies and driving around his adoptive land in his Tuk-Tuk.  

"There are only two or three Pioneers left," he said. "I've been fortunate and healthy enough to survive." 

This story originally appeared in The Courier-Journal and is reprinted with permission. In the photo above, which was published in The Concord, Ted Wade is in the second row, far right.

Tags: Featured News

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Ted Wade: Pioneer of sport and science

Oct 14, 2021, 17:49 PM by Erin McCabe
Being the first Black basketball player at Bellarmine is a small part of his legacy.

By Jonathan Saxon 

Louisville Courier-Journal 

Louisville is known for having its legends casually walk the streets, but what if someone told you Bellarmine's first Black basketball player walks beaches in Thailand? 

Ex-pat Theodore "Ted" Wade, 89, is a man of many talents who describes himself as a "retired gentleman of leisure" after a multi-decade career in the computer sciences field. 

"I've written five science fiction novels," Wade said in a Fourth of July video chat over Facebook. "I've been accused of thinking like (a) computer. I was on the leading edge of computer technology until my retirement in New York City. I worked for the Department of Defense for about 12 years" —1955-1962, according to his Facebook page. 

"He was certainly right there in the beginning," added Michael Wade, 66, Ted's oldest son, who is also retired and pursuing a degree in astrophysics at the University of Louisville. "Apparently, it's genetic because that's what I did my entire career." 

"He's never, ever accepted any limitations. We can all learn from that." -- Men's Coach Scott Davenport

Wade's been living in Thailand since 2015, following the passing of his second wife, Linda. He said living in the States without her was too much to bear, given the life and times they had carved out for themselves during their 56 years of marriage.  

"I couldn't walk the streets without having a memory," said Wade, as he recalled how he and Linda traveled everywhere together and created so many memories. "Walked here: We were here. She was a gambler, high roller. We went to all of the casinos, as far away as Las Vegas and as far east as Virginia. Every three months, we would go somewhere to a casino. After she died, I tried hard. But I can't do it. So I decided I just needed to get out of here. I went to Japan, and then to Thailand."  

'They protected me.' 

Before meeting Linda and traveling around the world, Wade was the first Black basketball player to play on a predominantly white college basketball team in Kentucky state history when he enrolled at Bellarmine University (then Bellarmine College) in 1950.  

"For me, it was a typical continuation of life," Wade said. "We all played basketball every day. I had a basketball court 50 yards from my house growing up. When Bellarmine opened, most were not athletically inclined or interested, but we had enough volunteers to form a team. I leaped at the opportunity. There was the problem of the new school not having a gymnasium. We had to borrow gym time from all of the Catholic schools around the community." 

While Wade says he doesn't recall anything on the court that was particularly impactful for him, he remembered that his teammates and coach never let the racist and prejudicial conditions of that era touch him. 

"Racism at the university? Zero," he said emphatically. "As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much. They wouldn't let that **** come in my face from the coach on down. They protected me 100 percent from the racism."  

He takes great pride in being part of the Pioneer Class at Bellarmine, the first group to attend classes when the college opened in 1950. While he was the only Black student in the class, he claims he never felt out of place at the school, in any context. He recalls an incident where an opposing coach suggested that he wasn't particularly welcome to play at his particular gym.  

"We played a college in Kentucky, and the coach said to our coach (Norb Raque), 'When you come down here, don't bring that n----- with you.' He said that to my coach. I wasn't aware of this at the time; I was told this after the fact. We went down there, and I played in the game." 

"Racism at the university? Zero. As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much."

Wade, who graduated from Central High School, also respected that Bellarmine kept its word regarding the promise made to students about the kind of education they would receive.  

"(The college) advertised, 'We do not teach you what to think, we teach you how to think," Wade said. "That impressed the hell out of me." 

Bellarmine men's basketball coach Scott Davenport hopes that people everywhere can learn from Wade's example. "He's never, ever accepted any limitations," Davenport said. "We can all learn from that." 

'Who is Admiral Miller?' 

While being the first Black student and basketball player in Bellarmine's history is noteworthy, so too is the story behind how Wade's outspoken candor and willingness to step up and speak out-landed him a job with the Olivetti Corporation of America. 

After receiving an honorable discharge from his service with the Air Force, Wade returned to Louisville to work for a now-defunct company called Louisville Medical Depot that was doing contract work for the Defense Department through the Defense Medical Supply Center. While working on one of the system's engineering projects, Wade noticed that the new programming instructions he received from an individual he identified as "Admiral Miller" could use some improvements.  

Wade expressed his concern with the new instructions and continued to implement his changes for two years before the disagreement with Admiral Miller came to a head. 

"They were sending down documentation for computer programming," he said. "And I'm reading through this stuff. I said, 'This is all [crap].' And I changed it for about two years. They interviewed me for about four days, and I really lost it near the end." 

Wade went back and forth with Admiral Miller for four days about why he kept adjusting programming instructions he was sent, even though Wade knew everything that one could know about programming languages at that point. On the fourth day, he let Admiral Miller know his true feelings. 

"I'm talking to this guy every day for about four or five days," he said. "And he kept saying, 'Admiral Miller says this….' And I said, 'Well, I'm looking at this [stuff]. I didn't do it, but I looked at it, and I did it better.' He said, 'Admiral Miller says this….' After about four days, I said, 'Who is Admiral Miller?' F--- Admiral Miller.'" 

The man leaned back and crossed his arms, Wade said, and said, "I'm Admiral Miller." 

"That day, I told my wife, 'I think I just lost my job,'" Wade said. 

But it turns out somebody respected the stand Wade took when it came to his work.  

"A week later [Olivetti] called down to Louisville," he said. "They said, 'We want you to come to New York City and do with [us] what you have done for the Department of Defense and Defense Medical Supply Center.' I said, 'I'll come, but you have to give me New York City money.'" 

Since then, Wade had used his Bellarmine education (he studied Business Administration while at Bellarmine before his college career was interrupted by service in the military during the Korean War; he also dabbled in Archaeology, Egyptology, History, and Cosmology) to come up with theories that he's discussed with scientists such as Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, the world-renowned astrophysicist, and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.  

One theory is called the Repetitive Big Bang Theory, Wade said. "I have actually talked to Dr. Tyson about it. He laughed at me and said, 'You can't prove it.' How do you prove something that takes 14 million years to happen? So I laugh about it."  

Now, Wade spends his days collecting the latest movies and driving around his adoptive land in his Tuk-Tuk.  

"There are only two or three Pioneers left," he said. "I've been fortunate and healthy enough to survive." 

This story originally appeared in The Courier-Journal and is reprinted with permission. In the photo above, which was published in The Concord, Ted Wade is in the second row, far right.

Ted Wade: Pioneer of sport and science

Oct 14, 2021, 17:49 PM by Erin McCabe
Being the first Black basketball player at Bellarmine is a small part of his legacy.

By Jonathan Saxon 

Louisville Courier-Journal 

Louisville is known for having its legends casually walk the streets, but what if someone told you Bellarmine's first Black basketball player walks beaches in Thailand? 

Ex-pat Theodore "Ted" Wade, 89, is a man of many talents who describes himself as a "retired gentleman of leisure" after a multi-decade career in the computer sciences field. 

"I've written five science fiction novels," Wade said in a Fourth of July video chat over Facebook. "I've been accused of thinking like (a) computer. I was on the leading edge of computer technology until my retirement in New York City. I worked for the Department of Defense for about 12 years" —1955-1962, according to his Facebook page. 

"He was certainly right there in the beginning," added Michael Wade, 66, Ted's oldest son, who is also retired and pursuing a degree in astrophysics at the University of Louisville. "Apparently, it's genetic because that's what I did my entire career." 

"He's never, ever accepted any limitations. We can all learn from that." -- Men's Coach Scott Davenport

Wade's been living in Thailand since 2015, following the passing of his second wife, Linda. He said living in the States without her was too much to bear, given the life and times they had carved out for themselves during their 56 years of marriage.  

"I couldn't walk the streets without having a memory," said Wade, as he recalled how he and Linda traveled everywhere together and created so many memories. "Walked here: We were here. She was a gambler, high roller. We went to all of the casinos, as far away as Las Vegas and as far east as Virginia. Every three months, we would go somewhere to a casino. After she died, I tried hard. But I can't do it. So I decided I just needed to get out of here. I went to Japan, and then to Thailand."  

'They protected me.' 

Before meeting Linda and traveling around the world, Wade was the first Black basketball player to play on a predominantly white college basketball team in Kentucky state history when he enrolled at Bellarmine University (then Bellarmine College) in 1950.  

"For me, it was a typical continuation of life," Wade said. "We all played basketball every day. I had a basketball court 50 yards from my house growing up. When Bellarmine opened, most were not athletically inclined or interested, but we had enough volunteers to form a team. I leaped at the opportunity. There was the problem of the new school not having a gymnasium. We had to borrow gym time from all of the Catholic schools around the community." 

While Wade says he doesn't recall anything on the court that was particularly impactful for him, he remembered that his teammates and coach never let the racist and prejudicial conditions of that era touch him. 

"Racism at the university? Zero," he said emphatically. "As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much. They wouldn't let that **** come in my face from the coach on down. They protected me 100 percent from the racism."  

He takes great pride in being part of the Pioneer Class at Bellarmine, the first group to attend classes when the college opened in 1950. While he was the only Black student in the class, he claims he never felt out of place at the school, in any context. He recalls an incident where an opposing coach suggested that he wasn't particularly welcome to play at his particular gym.  

"We played a college in Kentucky, and the coach said to our coach (Norb Raque), 'When you come down here, don't bring that n----- with you.' He said that to my coach. I wasn't aware of this at the time; I was told this after the fact. We went down there, and I played in the game." 

"Racism at the university? Zero. As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much."

Wade, who graduated from Central High School, also respected that Bellarmine kept its word regarding the promise made to students about the kind of education they would receive.  

"(The college) advertised, 'We do not teach you what to think, we teach you how to think," Wade said. "That impressed the hell out of me." 

Bellarmine men's basketball coach Scott Davenport hopes that people everywhere can learn from Wade's example. "He's never, ever accepted any limitations," Davenport said. "We can all learn from that." 

'Who is Admiral Miller?' 

While being the first Black student and basketball player in Bellarmine's history is noteworthy, so too is the story behind how Wade's outspoken candor and willingness to step up and speak out-landed him a job with the Olivetti Corporation of America. 

After receiving an honorable discharge from his service with the Air Force, Wade returned to Louisville to work for a now-defunct company called Louisville Medical Depot that was doing contract work for the Defense Department through the Defense Medical Supply Center. While working on one of the system's engineering projects, Wade noticed that the new programming instructions he received from an individual he identified as "Admiral Miller" could use some improvements.  

Wade expressed his concern with the new instructions and continued to implement his changes for two years before the disagreement with Admiral Miller came to a head. 

"They were sending down documentation for computer programming," he said. "And I'm reading through this stuff. I said, 'This is all [crap].' And I changed it for about two years. They interviewed me for about four days, and I really lost it near the end." 

Wade went back and forth with Admiral Miller for four days about why he kept adjusting programming instructions he was sent, even though Wade knew everything that one could know about programming languages at that point. On the fourth day, he let Admiral Miller know his true feelings. 

"I'm talking to this guy every day for about four or five days," he said. "And he kept saying, 'Admiral Miller says this….' And I said, 'Well, I'm looking at this [stuff]. I didn't do it, but I looked at it, and I did it better.' He said, 'Admiral Miller says this….' After about four days, I said, 'Who is Admiral Miller?' F--- Admiral Miller.'" 

The man leaned back and crossed his arms, Wade said, and said, "I'm Admiral Miller." 

"That day, I told my wife, 'I think I just lost my job,'" Wade said. 

But it turns out somebody respected the stand Wade took when it came to his work.  

"A week later [Olivetti] called down to Louisville," he said. "They said, 'We want you to come to New York City and do with [us] what you have done for the Department of Defense and Defense Medical Supply Center.' I said, 'I'll come, but you have to give me New York City money.'" 

Since then, Wade had used his Bellarmine education (he studied Business Administration while at Bellarmine before his college career was interrupted by service in the military during the Korean War; he also dabbled in Archaeology, Egyptology, History, and Cosmology) to come up with theories that he's discussed with scientists such as Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, the world-renowned astrophysicist, and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.  

One theory is called the Repetitive Big Bang Theory, Wade said. "I have actually talked to Dr. Tyson about it. He laughed at me and said, 'You can't prove it.' How do you prove something that takes 14 million years to happen? So I laugh about it."  

Now, Wade spends his days collecting the latest movies and driving around his adoptive land in his Tuk-Tuk.  

"There are only two or three Pioneers left," he said. "I've been fortunate and healthy enough to survive." 

This story originally appeared in The Courier-Journal and is reprinted with permission. In the photo above, which was published in The Concord, Ted Wade is in the second row, far right.

Ted Wade: Pioneer of sport and science

Oct 14, 2021, 17:49 PM by Erin McCabe
Being the first Black basketball player at Bellarmine is a small part of his legacy.

By Jonathan Saxon 

Louisville Courier-Journal 

Louisville is known for having its legends casually walk the streets, but what if someone told you Bellarmine's first Black basketball player walks beaches in Thailand? 

Ex-pat Theodore "Ted" Wade, 89, is a man of many talents who describes himself as a "retired gentleman of leisure" after a multi-decade career in the computer sciences field. 

"I've written five science fiction novels," Wade said in a Fourth of July video chat over Facebook. "I've been accused of thinking like (a) computer. I was on the leading edge of computer technology until my retirement in New York City. I worked for the Department of Defense for about 12 years" —1955-1962, according to his Facebook page. 

"He was certainly right there in the beginning," added Michael Wade, 66, Ted's oldest son, who is also retired and pursuing a degree in astrophysics at the University of Louisville. "Apparently, it's genetic because that's what I did my entire career." 

"He's never, ever accepted any limitations. We can all learn from that." -- Men's Coach Scott Davenport

Wade's been living in Thailand since 2015, following the passing of his second wife, Linda. He said living in the States without her was too much to bear, given the life and times they had carved out for themselves during their 56 years of marriage.  

"I couldn't walk the streets without having a memory," said Wade, as he recalled how he and Linda traveled everywhere together and created so many memories. "Walked here: We were here. She was a gambler, high roller. We went to all of the casinos, as far away as Las Vegas and as far east as Virginia. Every three months, we would go somewhere to a casino. After she died, I tried hard. But I can't do it. So I decided I just needed to get out of here. I went to Japan, and then to Thailand."  

'They protected me.' 

Before meeting Linda and traveling around the world, Wade was the first Black basketball player to play on a predominantly white college basketball team in Kentucky state history when he enrolled at Bellarmine University (then Bellarmine College) in 1950.  

"For me, it was a typical continuation of life," Wade said. "We all played basketball every day. I had a basketball court 50 yards from my house growing up. When Bellarmine opened, most were not athletically inclined or interested, but we had enough volunteers to form a team. I leaped at the opportunity. There was the problem of the new school not having a gymnasium. We had to borrow gym time from all of the Catholic schools around the community." 

While Wade says he doesn't recall anything on the court that was particularly impactful for him, he remembered that his teammates and coach never let the racist and prejudicial conditions of that era touch him. 

"Racism at the university? Zero," he said emphatically. "As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much. They wouldn't let that **** come in my face from the coach on down. They protected me 100 percent from the racism."  

He takes great pride in being part of the Pioneer Class at Bellarmine, the first group to attend classes when the college opened in 1950. While he was the only Black student in the class, he claims he never felt out of place at the school, in any context. He recalls an incident where an opposing coach suggested that he wasn't particularly welcome to play at his particular gym.  

"We played a college in Kentucky, and the coach said to our coach (Norb Raque), 'When you come down here, don't bring that n----- with you.' He said that to my coach. I wasn't aware of this at the time; I was told this after the fact. We went down there, and I played in the game." 

"Racism at the university? Zero. As a matter of fact, there was a lot of racism I didn't know about because they protected me so much."

Wade, who graduated from Central High School, also respected that Bellarmine kept its word regarding the promise made to students about the kind of education they would receive.  

"(The college) advertised, 'We do not teach you what to think, we teach you how to think," Wade said. "That impressed the hell out of me." 

Bellarmine men's basketball coach Scott Davenport hopes that people everywhere can learn from Wade's example. "He's never, ever accepted any limitations," Davenport said. "We can all learn from that." 

'Who is Admiral Miller?' 

While being the first Black student and basketball player in Bellarmine's history is noteworthy, so too is the story behind how Wade's outspoken candor and willingness to step up and speak out-landed him a job with the Olivetti Corporation of America. 

After receiving an honorable discharge from his service with the Air Force, Wade returned to Louisville to work for a now-defunct company called Louisville Medical Depot that was doing contract work for the Defense Department through the Defense Medical Supply Center. While working on one of the system's engineering projects, Wade noticed that the new programming instructions he received from an individual he identified as "Admiral Miller" could use some improvements.  

Wade expressed his concern with the new instructions and continued to implement his changes for two years before the disagreement with Admiral Miller came to a head. 

"They were sending down documentation for computer programming," he said. "And I'm reading through this stuff. I said, 'This is all [crap].' And I changed it for about two years. They interviewed me for about four days, and I really lost it near the end." 

Wade went back and forth with Admiral Miller for four days about why he kept adjusting programming instructions he was sent, even though Wade knew everything that one could know about programming languages at that point. On the fourth day, he let Admiral Miller know his true feelings. 

"I'm talking to this guy every day for about four or five days," he said. "And he kept saying, 'Admiral Miller says this….' And I said, 'Well, I'm looking at this [stuff]. I didn't do it, but I looked at it, and I did it better.' He said, 'Admiral Miller says this….' After about four days, I said, 'Who is Admiral Miller?' F--- Admiral Miller.'" 

The man leaned back and crossed his arms, Wade said, and said, "I'm Admiral Miller." 

"That day, I told my wife, 'I think I just lost my job,'" Wade said. 

But it turns out somebody respected the stand Wade took when it came to his work.  

"A week later [Olivetti] called down to Louisville," he said. "They said, 'We want you to come to New York City and do with [us] what you have done for the Department of Defense and Defense Medical Supply Center.' I said, 'I'll come, but you have to give me New York City money.'" 

Since then, Wade had used his Bellarmine education (he studied Business Administration while at Bellarmine before his college career was interrupted by service in the military during the Korean War; he also dabbled in Archaeology, Egyptology, History, and Cosmology) to come up with theories that he's discussed with scientists such as Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, the world-renowned astrophysicist, and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.  

One theory is called the Repetitive Big Bang Theory, Wade said. "I have actually talked to Dr. Tyson about it. He laughed at me and said, 'You can't prove it.' How do you prove something that takes 14 million years to happen? So I laugh about it."  

Now, Wade spends his days collecting the latest movies and driving around his adoptive land in his Tuk-Tuk.  

"There are only two or three Pioneers left," he said. "I've been fortunate and healthy enough to survive." 

This story originally appeared in The Courier-Journal and is reprinted with permission. In the photo above, which was published in The Concord, Ted Wade is in the second row, far right.

 

Course Descriptions

Biology 300, Pathophysiology (3)

This course will introduce the biological underpinnings of human disease from a molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ-system perspective. Both the structural and functional changes that cause or are caused by disease processes will be emphasized. This course is designed for Nursing and other health science majors. It may not be used as a BIOL elective by majors. Three hours lecture. PREREQUISITES: BIOL 108 and 109, or similar background in anatomy and physiology.

Nursing 205 Foundations of Nursing (4)

This course is designed to introduce the nursing process, knowledge, concepts, and skills of nursing care. The nursing process is used to examine alterations in health status and functioning. The skills lab and acute care facilities provide the setting for clinical experiences. (4 hours of class per week; 90 hours of laboratory/clinical per semester. PREREQUISITE: admission to the BSN Accel track.) 

Nursing 206 Transcultural Communication in Healthcare (3)

This course provides theory and practice using culturally competent communication as a foundation for nursing care. This course introduces the IOM core competencies and examines the role of the professional nurse in today’s global healthcare environment. The course introduces world health and federal policies to guide practice. (6 hours of class per week.) PREREQUISITE: admission to the BSN Accel track. 

Nursing 221 General Principles of Drug Classification I (2)

This is the first of two related courses focusing on the action and therapeutic use of medication and application of medication therapy in nursing care of adults experiencing fluid and electrolyte imbalance; cardiac, respiratory, hematologic, and neoplastic disorders; HIV/ AIDS; and peri/post-operative care will be examined. (2 hours of class per week. PREREQUISITES: NURS 205, 206, 311.) 

Nursing 230 Nursing Process with Adults, I (5)

This course focuses on implementation of the nursing process with ill adults who are experiencing fluid and electrolyte, cardiac, respiratory, hematologic, and neoplastic disorders. Perioperative care and HIV/AIDS are also examined. The skills lab and acute care facilities provide the setting for clinical experiences. (6 hours class per week; 90 hours clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 205, 206, 311; Corequisites: BIOL 300; NURS 221.

Nursing 305 Nursing Process with Children (4.5)

This course provides application of the nursing process to the care of children. The focus is on family centered nursing care with a goal of health promotion, injury and disease prevention, and illness management. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of settings. (3 hours of class per week; and 67.5 hours of clinical.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 330, 401.

Nursing 310 Nursing Process with Adults II (5)

This course offers a continued focus on the nursing process with ill adults. Emphasis is placed on the nursing care of adults experiencing disorders of gastrointestinal, renal, neurological, musculoskeletal, sensory (eye and ear), urinary, renal, prostate, and endocrine function. Further opportunity is provided for the application of nursing concepts and skills in the clinical setting. (6 hours of class per week; and 90 hours of clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 230, 311, 321; BIOL 300.

Nursing 311 Health Assessment (3)

This course focuses on health assessment of the adult client. Students will develop skills for obtaining health histories and performing physical examinations and documentation. (4 hours of class per week; and 45 hours of laboratory per semester.) PREREQUISITE: admission to the BSN Accel track.

Nursing 312 Health Care Research (3)

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of evidence-based practice. It includes examination of selected health care research for applicability to clinical practice. Critical analysis of health care research studies is emphasized. PRE/COREQUISITE: MATH 205.

Nursing 321 Gen. Principles of Drug Classification II (2)

This is the second of two related courses focusing on the action and therapeutic use of medications and application of medication therapy in nursing care of adults experiencing disorders of gastrointestinal, renal, neurological, musculoskeletal, sensory (eye and ear), urinary, renal, prostate, and endocrine function. (4 hours of class per week.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 221, 230; BIOL 300. 

Nursing 330 Nursing Process with Women and Their Families (4.5)

This course focuses on a wellness approach to the developmental changes women experience. The nursing process will be used to meet the health care needs of childbearing families and women throughout the lifespan. (6 hours of class per week; and 67.5 hours of clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 310, 312, 321; BIOL 300.

Nursing 401 Mental Health Nursing (5)

The focus of this course is on the theory and practice of psychiatric mental health nursing in the hospital and community. Emphasis is on the development of therapeutic relationships with individuals using the nursing process. Course content includes nursing care provided to people with major psychiatric disorders as well as to people who are victims of violence. (3 hours class per week; 67.5 hours clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 310, 312, 321.

Nursing 415 Community and Public Health Nursing (4.5)

This course provides an overview of community and public health nursing and practice, focusing on health promotion and disease prevention across the lifespan.  The development, provision, and management of care for individuals, families, and groups within community settings are emphasized.  (2.5 hours class per week; 67.5 hours clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 330, 401; PSYC 218. 

Nursing 430 Complex Health Problems (5)

This course focuses on the provision of professional nursing care to clients with complex health problems. Emphasis is placed on use of the nursing process with individuals and families in secondary or tertiary settings. (6 hours of class per week; and 90 hours of clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 330, 401.

Nursing 455 Leadership and Management in Health Care (4.5)

This course addresses trends, issues, and the economic and political aspects of health care organizations. The role of the nurse as a leader and manager in the provision of nursing care within health care organizations is emphasized. (6 hours of class per week; and 45 hours of clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 330, 401. 

Nursing 498 NCLEX Review I

The course is designed to assist students in reviewing critical concepts covered throughout the nursing program. Using the results of standardized tests students develop a personalized study plan for NCELX-RN, complete an online review course, simulation, and case studies which will assist students in prioritizing care, developing critical thinking skills, and review for NCLEX-RN. (1 hour of class per week and 45 hours of clinical per semester.) This 0 credit, Pass/Fail course continues over to the next session with NURA 499 in which 2 credits and an A to F letter grade will be awarded. 

Nursing 499 NCLEX Review II

The course is designed to assist students in reviewing critical concepts covered throughout the nursing program. Using the results of standardized tests students develop a personalized study plan for NCELX-RN, complete an online review course, simulation, and case studies which will assist students in prioritizing care, developing critical thinking skills, and review for NCLEX-RN. (1 hour of class per week, online study, and 45 hours of clinical per semester.) PREREQUISITES: NURS 305, 415. 

Application Deadlines

The priority application deadline is November 1, 2021. All applicants must apply through the Nursing Centralized Application Service (CAS) at www.nursingcas.org. Applicants must complete the entire application, including entry of all previous coursework. The CAS application fee is $55.

It takes Nursing CAS 4-6 weeks to verify your application and submit it to Bellarmine University after you submit it to Nursing CAS.

You must submit all official transcripts (even if coursework is “In Progress”) directly to Nursing CAS. They will not verify an application without all transcripts. 

You may apply before enrolling in pre-reqs or while enrolled in pre-requisite courses.  

You may apply if you will earn your bachelor’s degree in the spring semester of the program year. 

We do not require a supplemental application or fee. 

Upon admission to the program, students must submit a $100 non-refundable tuition deposit to confirm their position in the program.

When should I apply for other financial aid?

Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov as soon as possible after October 1 of your senior year in high school. List Bellarmine as a school to receive your information. Bellarmine’s school code is 001954. There will be opportunities to make adjustments if your circumstances change.

What are Institutional Scholarships, Grants and Loans?

Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov as soon as possible after October 1 of your senior year in high school. List Bellarmine as a school to receive your information. Bellarmine’s school code is 001954. There will be opportunities to make adjustments if your circumstances change.

Simple Accordion

Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov as soon as possible after October 1 of your senior year in high school. List Bellarmine as a school to receive your information. Bellarmine’s school code is 001954. There will be opportunities to make adjustments if your circumstances change.

Simple Gray Accordion H4

Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov as soon as possible after October 1 of your senior year in high school. List Bellarmine as a school to receive your information. Bellarmine’s school code is 001954. There will be opportunities to make adjustments if your circumstances change.

Simple Gray Accordion

Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov as soon as possible after October 1 of your senior year in high school. List Bellarmine as a school to receive your information. Bellarmine’s school code is 001954. There will be opportunities to make adjustments if your circumstances change.

Contact Information

 

Invest in an Affordable Degree

Receive a private school education at a state school cost. One hundred percent of Bellarmine undergraduate students receive some form of financial aid, allowing students of all backgrounds to attend. We offer a variety of scholarships grants and awards to help make it easier for you to attain a top-notch education.

Learn More About Financial Aid

About Bellarmine University

Bellarmine University is a vibrant community of educational excellence and ethical awareness that consistently ranks among the nation’s best colleges and universities. Our students pursue an education based in the liberal arts – and in the distinguished, inclusive Catholic tradition of educational excellence, the oldest and most rewarding in the western world. It is a lifelong education, worthy of the university’s namesake, Saint Robert Bellarmine, and of his invitation to each of us to learn and live In Veritatis Amore – in the love of all that is beautiful, true and good in life.