Faculty

At Bellarmine, inspired teaching leads to inspired learning. You will learn in small classes from a distinguished faculty, 84 percent of whom hold the highest degree in their field of study. The depth of their passion for teaching is perhaps exceeded only by the quality of the institutions from which they earned their credentials.

While the emphasis is on teaching, many Bellarmine faculty members conduct scholarly research designed to provide breakthrough knowledge in their area of expertise. Bellarmine students have done research with faculty members to study a wide range of subjects from the function of the artificial heart in outer space, to the mechanics of how limbs break, which may help in the design of air bags and other safety devices aimed at reducing injuries. Student involvement with faculty research also provides opportunities to assist with writing papers and preparing presentations for national conferences.

Curtis R. Bergstrand, Ph.D

Dr. Curtis Bergstrand has taught at Bellarmine since 1979. He received his undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Denver, his Masters in Criminal Justice from Sam Houston State University, and his Ph.D. in sociology from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. He is married to Dr. Nancy Schrepf, a psychologist, and has two grown children. Dr. Bergstrand has had a variety of experiences in the criminal justice system throughout his career. As an undergraduate he worked at Lookout Mountain School For Boys in Golden, CO as a counselor; in his Master's program he interned at Texas' maximum security prison in Huntsville, and for the past twenty years he has coordinated several programs at prisons in Kentucky that involve students, including Books Behind Bars and Thespians, Inc. His teaching and research interests include sociological theory, research, criminal justice, and the family. He has published numerous scholarly articles in the areas of health care, social problems, the family, and criminology. He recently wrote a book on marital deviance published by Praeger Press.

Perry Chang Ph.D.

Perry Chang has a Ph.D. in history and sociology from New York City’s New School for Social Research. He conducted survey research and focus group research for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) for eight years. His research interests have included the abortion conflict, Reconstruction, immigration, and congregational growth. He has taught Introduction to Sociology, Contemporary American Social Problems, Race and Ethnicity, and Social Movements at Bellarmine. He and his wife, son, dog, and three turtles live in New Albany, Indiana.

Bill Curley

Bill Curley holds a Master's Degree in Law Enforcement Administration from Western Illinois University.  He is currently an adjunct faculty member teaching Criminal Profiling, Comparative Criminal Justice Systems, Global Terrorism and a course on Careers in Law Enforcement. He has taught at Bellarmine since 2004 and previously was an adjunct faculty member at Eastern Kentucky University, where he taught for five years.  He is a retired Federal Agent having served for over 25 years with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, retiring as the Special Agent in Charge of the states of Kentucky, Indiana and West Virginia.  He also taught and developed courses at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center located in Georgia. He specialized in investigating Arson For Profit cases and traveled nationwide developing Arson Task Forces throughout the country. 

Kathy Eigelbach

Kathy Eigelbach is an adjunct faculty member in the Criminal Justice Studies Program. She teaches classes in Corrections, Women in the Criminal Justice System, and Policing America. Additionally, she is the internship coordinator for the CJS program. She retired from the St. Matthews, KY Police Department after 21 years of service, where she served as the Assistnat Chief. Kathy earned her M.S. degree in Criminal Justice from Eastern Kentucky University and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy.

Frank Hutchins, Ph.D.

Dr. Hutchins is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Bellarmine. He earned his BA from the University of Kentucky, his MA from the Patterson School of Diplomacy at UK, and his PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on cultural change amongst indigenous peoples in the Amazonian and Andean regions of Ecuador. He was a Peace Corps volunteer in Ecuador, and continues to do research and work there as director of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Summer Field School in Ecuador for the Study of Language, Culture, & Community Health. At Bellarmine, he teaches Introduction to Cultural Anthropology; Introduction to Human Geography; Anthropology of Mind and Body; Anthropology of the Supernatural and Sacred; Anthropology and the Environment; and Theory and Methods in Anthropology. Dr. Hutchins also serves as coordinator of the IDC 301 courses. He is the co-editor, along with Dr. Patrick Wilson, of Editing Eden: A Reconsideration of Identity, Politics, and Place in Amazonia (University of Nebraska Press, 2010). He is a native of Bardstown, KY, and he and his wife, Christine, have one daughter, Anna.

Richard Jenks holds a Ph.D. from the University of Missouri - Columbia, where he specialized in social psychology. He is currently an Adjunct faculty member at Bellarmine where he teaches Introductory Sociology and Social Problems, and Professor of Sociology at Indiana University Southeast, where he teaches courses related to Social Problems, Social Psychology, and Social Movements. His research interests have included issues related to social pschology, deviance, family, and religion. He has published articles in the area of political behavior, smoking behavior, attitudes towards gays, co-marital sexuality, and divorce and annulments.  In 1995, he was presented with the Outstanding Research and Creativity Award at Indiana University Southeast and, in 2002, authored Divorce, Annulments, and the Catholic Church, published by the Haworth Press.

Ted Palmer holds a J.D. from the Louis D. Bradeis School of Law, University of Louisville, and is a graduate of Bellarmine University.  Currently an adjunct faculty member, he teaches Famous Criminal Trials.  His areas of interest include criminal law, criminal procedure and Constitutional law.

Nancy Schrepf, Psy.D.  Dr. Schrepf has an undergraduate degree in sociology from the University of Nebraska and a Doctorate in Psychology from Spalding University in Louisville.  She worked as a forensic psychologist in the Kentucky prison system for 20 years.  She also maintains a private practice in individual and couples counseling.  She co-authored a book, Fatherless Children, and has numerous publications in scholarly journals on the family, social problems, and deviant behavior.  She regularly teaches courses in Deviant Behavior, Marriage and Family, Counseling the Offender, Abnormal Psychology, and the Sociology of Cults.

Greg Smith, M.A

Mr. Smith graduated from Bellarmine with a degree in English and received his M.A. in Community Development from the University of Louisville.  A police officer for 30 years, Mr. Smith was acting Chief of Police in Louisville for 5 years.  He regularly teaches the introductory course in criminal justice for the Department.

Steve Smith - Mr. Smith received his B.A. in Sociology from Bellarmine University and his M.A. in Psychology from Spalding University.  Retired from the Kentucky Department of Corrections, he worked in the prison system and served as warden of Luther Luckett Correctional Complex for several years.  After leaving the state correctional system he became executive director of Dismas Charities halfway houses in Louisville.  He currently is actively involved in numerous planning organizations in the local Louisville community attempting to improve resources available to inmates returning from prison.  Mr. Smith teaches Corrections courses in the criminal justice studies program.

Dr. Matisa D. Wilbon

Dr. Matisa Wilbon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology/Sociology/Criminal Justice Studies at Bellarmine University. She teaches introductory and upper level courses centered on her research interests including: crime and the media, juvenile delinquency, and structural inequality. In addition to teaching, Dr. Wilbon is an active researcher writing and publishing in the areas of drug and alcohol use/abuse, adolescent sexual behavior, and stratification. A 2013 Oxford Fellow, she recently conducted research on Malcolm X at Oxford University, specifically examining cultural identity comparing the U.S. and the U.K. Dr. Wilbon also conducts evaluation research with the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), a national research firm, examining mentoring on youth outcomes. Demonstrating a passion for leadership development and civic engagement, Dr. Wilbon was appointed Director of Bellarmine University’s Brown Scholars Leadership Program, a four-year program that nurtures and cultivates the leadership and communication skills of outstanding students. She continues to serve in this capacity. Dr. Wilbon earned her B.A. in Anthropology/Sociology from Centre College, where she received the 2012 Distinguished Alumna award, and received her Masters and Doctorate degrees in Sociology from The Ohio State University. A native of eastern Kentucky, Dr. Wilbon enjoys spending time with her children, Deshawn and Taiya, traveling, and mentoring area youth with her husband of fifteen years, Mr. Lawrence Wilbon, Youth and Education Director of the Louisville Urban League.

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