TRADITION AND TRANSFORMATION

Focusing on student success, inclusion, and academic innovation

OUR STRATEGIC PLAN


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FROM THE PRESIDENT

 

As Bellarmine’s fourth president, I stand proudly on the shoulders of the presidents who came before me, and who built Bellarmine from a small, all-male college to a co-educational university of regional stature, most recently with the completion of a $100 million capital campaign and the growth realized under Vision 2020.

Still, in many ways, Bellarmine remains a “best-kept secret” of higher education. I consider it a privilege to build upon that vision and to move the institution forward to even greater prominence and impact. It is time now for Bellarmine University to re-envision its future as an innovative liberal arts institution that meets the demands of its students and serves the needs of a changing world.

“Tradition and Transformation,” our Strategic Plan, will guide the university for the next five to seven years. It enhances, clarifies, and strengthens the distinctive qualities that make Bellarmine a valuable institution and that will keep it one going forward.

Students’ needs and expectations are changing, and we need to meet them where they are. While we will, of course, maintain our commitment to academic excellence enriched by the liberal arts, we will embrace new ways of delivering it, including more graduate courses; more online and hybrid courses; and more continuing education opportunities. We will also expand learning opportunities by establishing civic and community partnerships.

We will expand our geographic reach in recruiting students and develop a comprehensive plan to attract more diverse students, as well as a more diverse faculty and staff.

We will focus on developing highly personalized pathways to success for every student that begin with application and carry through to their landing a job or enrolling in post-graduate study, and we will work to enhance the vibrancy of on-campus life. We will explore ways to raise our profile regionally and nationally. And we will work diligently to make a Bellarmine education affordable and accessible to students of all backgrounds, while remaining responsible stewards of our university resources.

We will do all of this in pursuit of the mission to educate the whole person—mind, body, and spirit.

This Strategic Plan reflects the hard work of a Steering Committee of 29 members of the Bellarmine community who were charged with designating a focused set of four to six inspiring, broad-based, high-level priorities that cut across schools, departments, and units and that reflected the university’s mission.

One of the Steering Committee’s most important goals was to create many opportunities for every member of the Bellarmine community—faculty, students, staff, alumni, donors, and key officials in the city of Louisville—to participate in the planning process. They achieved this through town halls, online surveys, and many face-to-face meetings.

In all, more than 3,000 touch points from these stakeholders informed the Strategic Plan. The high-level priorities and detailed implementation plans will influence the university budget for fiscal years 2020 and 2021. The implementation plans will allow the university to create measures of success and hold the campus community accountable for achieving them. These plans will be updated annually. 

I am grateful to everyone who worked on this plan and who will continue to lead us in our efforts to realize the incredible outcomes that it boldly envisions. Each one of us believes in the critical difference that this university makes in the lives of our students, the community, and the region, and we will continue to aspire to excellence in all that we do.

—Susan M. Donovan, Ph.D., President

 

 

HISTORY

 

On October 3, 1950, Bellarmine College, a Catholic, liberal arts men’s college, opened its doors to its first class of 115 freshman “pioneer students.” The new college, named for Jesuit Saint Roberto Bellarmino, was the brainchild of Archbishop John Floersh, Rev. Raymond J. Treece, and the school’s founding president, Rev. Alfred F. Horrigan.

The college’s footprint was humble—just one building, today’s Pasteur Hall—but its aspirations were mighty. The founding “Statement of Purposes” based the new institution on the Catholic intellectual tradition, and stressed the need for humility and honesty in the search for an integrated approach to truth. 

Further, the statement declared “The college will strive to furnish both the intellectual insights into the philosophy of democracy and the motivations for social responsibility, without which a democratic form of government cannot prosper.”

It went on to declare this audacious goal: “The college does not accept the notion that a school’s responsibility is to teach students simply to fit into the society in which they live. It submits that students must be taught to evaluate this society and to exercise their trained powers to change it wherever necessary.” 

Since its opening day, Bellarmine has affirmed the intrinsic dignity of every individual, a commitment evidenced by its status among the first racially integrated institutions in the commonwealth.

Upon this bedrock, Bellarmine was born. 

Despite many daunting economic challenges, Bellarmine College grew and prospered. In 1968, the college merged with nearby Ursuline College, gaining the benefit of that school’s rich Ursuline traditions, its faculty, and its female students, as well as the Ursuline values of intellectual cultivation, compassion, and service to others. 

In the coming decades, the college continued to expand, adding substantial enrollment, residence halls, classroom buildings, graduate programs, and faculty. Its W.L. Lyons Brown Library is home to the Thomas Merton Center, the official repository of Merton’s artistic estate, which houses more than 50,000 Merton-related materials. Merton, renowned author, monk, and social critic, is the university’s spiritual inspiration. Bellarmine students learn Merton’s wisdom about the search for the true self, the interconnectedness of life, and the solidarity of the human spirit, which transcends ethnic, religious, and social divisions.

In 2000, Bellarmine changed its name to Bellarmine University to reflect its status as a large Master’s University. The university added academic programs and faculty, substantially boosted alumni engagement and endowment, dramatically transformed its campus, and earned the designation of a primarily residential university. 

Similarly, Bellarmine’s burgeoning doctoral programs and master’s programs in fields like education, health sciences, and digital media, combined with the traditional liberal arts undergraduate academic core, rose to serve the needs of a growing, rapidly changing Louisville and its region. 

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Today, Bellarmine University’s campus consists of 32 buildings spread across 145 acres on-campus; boasts a total population of nearly 3,400 students, 176 full-time faculty members, and nearly 25,000 alumni; and annually ranks among the region’s top universities. In 2019, the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education elevated Bellarmine’s status to Doctoral Professional University to reflect the university’s growth in doctoral degree recipients. 

Despite this stunning growth, Bellarmine never lost sight of its core strength. By adhering to its values, integrity, small class sizes, independent Catholic ideals, and respect for all people, Bellarmine students today continue to live in veritatis amore, in the love of truth. 

 

 

 

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

 

Like a number of liberal arts colleges and universities today, Bellarmine faces many challenges. Over the past decade the stagnation in the number of U.S. high school graduates has led to decreasing enrollment at colleges and universities across the nation.

In 2016, Inside Higher Ed published a report predicting a shift through the year 2032 in the demographics of students who will be in the market for a higher education degree. In the Ohio River Valley alone, changing demographics of the prospective student pool suggest that we can expect up to a 10 percent drop in the number of high school graduates, and as our internal reports indicate, enrollment has remained consistently flat over past last three years.

We also face the continued challenges of affordability and accessibility, as many view Bellarmine as cost-prohibitive, and thus a barrier to higher education. This perception is especially true with respect to increasing access to underrepresented groups. 

Yet, while maintaining a strong enrollment is perhaps the biggest challenge, recruiting and retaining a diverse student body, making the Bellarmine education accessible to everyone, and most important, getting prospective students to believe in what we’re doing here, to embrace the value of intellectual curiosity, are crucial. 

Getting students to see the value of our liberal arts core, although a significant challenge, is not one that is idiosyncratic to Bellarmine. It requires us to explore the feasibility of programs that strengthen our curriculum, while transforming student experience, and strengthening student belief in the education we are offering. In fact, the underlying question is: How do we get students, parents, alumni, donors, and friends to appreciate and embrace Bellarmine’s mission and long-standing tradition of social justice and engagement with broader communities? A larger part of this challenge is finding students who are the best fit for our mission.

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Challenged with recruiting students who see Bellarmine as their home means not only ensuring that there are more diverse and inclusive faculty, staff, and students, but also strengthening our ties with the professional and business communities, and channeling more resources toward the development of local partnerships with, for example, the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, to create seamless and enhanced pathways for students wishing to transfer to Bellarmine. This also means that our approach cannot be exclusively regional in focus; we must broaden our outreach to target underrepresented communities and those who share an interest in service for the public good. 

As education moves online, we are behind in getting there; however, since 2014 we have had Health Sciences programs online, and the Schools of Education and Health Sciences have recently designed fully online master’s programs in Education and Nursing. We need to be more deft and innovative in order to grow online learning and consider innovative practices and programs that can be implemented quickly, and we can bring more faculty on board, especially for General Education courses, which will provide the greatest return in attracting and keeping students. 

Facing an uncertain financial future, an increasingly politically polarized public perception of higher education, as well as an attack on liberal arts education, Bellarmine can address these challenges by reaffirming and critically articulating the value of a liberal arts education in a changing world. Indeed, the liberal arts are essential in navigating the complexity of the modern world. From technology to environmental sustainability, the best policymakers are those who have a deep grounding in what it means to be an informed critical thinker.

 

 

 

MISSION, VISION and VALUES


Our Mission

We are an inclusive Catholic university that educates students—mind, body, and spirit—for meaningful lives, rewarding careers, ethical leadership, and service to improve the human condition.

Our Vision

We will become the leading Catholic university in the South by embracing innovation and creativity, forging new and mutually beneficial partnerships, intentionally diversifying curricula and community, and providing a distinctive and transformative student experience.

Our Values

Bellarmine University finds its Catholic identity in the inclusive spirit of Thomas Merton. We believe in the search for the true self, the interconnectedness of life and the solidarity of the human spirit, which transcends ethnic, religious, and social divisions. We educate the whole person to realize their highest potential as part of an interconnected world. Our values are Academic Excellence, Intrinsic Dignity, Social Responsibility, Integrity, Hospitality, and Stewardship.

Academic Excellence

Promoting academic inquiry rooted in the liberal arts tradition—critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativity, and compassion—with an expectation of excellence

Intrinsic Dignity

Respecting the intrinsic value and dignity of every individual

Social Responsibility

Cultivating grounded citizens who contribute to and advocate for the public good, environmental sustainability, global understanding, and informed civic engagement 

Integrity

Fostering strong ethical principles, honesty, fairness, transparency, and trustworthiness

Hospitality

Creating an inclusive community that welcomes all and models a spirit of goodwill 

Stewardship

Exercising thoughtful stewardship of our university resources 

 

 

THE PATH FORWARD


Strategic Priority 1

At the very core of Bellarmine’s mission and institutional identity is our enduring commitment to a quality education. Rooted in the rich tradition of the liberal arts and sciences while also offering opportunities to acquire knowledge in professional fields, a Bellarmine education prepares students for lives of meaning and value.

Strategic Priority 2

As proud as we are of this transformative student experience, we recognize that we need to transform ourselves as well, adapting and innovating to meet the needs of 21st-century learners. We thus look to a future in which Bellarmine will embrace new technologies, pedagogies, and ideas, changing the education we provide and how we provide it in order to better equip our students for a rapidly changing world.

Strategic Priority 3

We also recognize that we must transform ourselves by expanding and diversifying our student population and geographic reach so that more people from more places and backgrounds can receive the benefit of a Bellarmine education; and that, once we attract new diverse populations to campus, we must put in place support systems for their success.

Strategic Priority 4

This emphasis on equity and inclusion extends to our larger Bellarmine community as well. We are dedicated to fostering an institutional environment with faculty and staff who are representative of the diversity and vibrancy of Louisville and the region.

Strategic Priority 5

We are likewise committed to strengthening our connection to the city, state, and region of which we are a part by seeking out new avenues for partnership and collaboration.

Strategic Priority 6

Lastly, we realize none of this is possible if we are not good stewards of our resources. As such, we will both explore new sources of revenue and carefully examine the financial feasibility of existing programs and initiatives, thereby securing a financially sustainable future in which Bellarmine will flourish.

 

Strategic Priority 2

As proud as we are of this transformative student experience, we recognize that we need to transform ourselves as well, adapting and innovating to meet the needs of 21st-century learners. We thus look to a future in which Bellarmine will embrace new technologies, pedagogies, and ideas, changing the education we provide and how we provide it in order to better equip our students for a rapidly changing world.

Strategic Priority 3

We also recognize that we must transform ourselves by expanding and diversifying our student population and geographic reach so that more people from more places and backgrounds can receive the benefit of a Bellarmine education; and that, once we attract new diverse populations to campus, we must put in place support systems for their success.

Strategic Priority 4

This emphasis on equity and inclusion extends to our larger Bellarmine community as well. We are dedicated to fostering an institutional environment with faculty and staff who are representative of the diversity and vibrancy of Louisville and the region.

Strategic Priority 5

We are likewise committed to strengthening our connection to the city, state, and region of which we are a part by seeking out new avenues for partnership and collaboration.

Strategic Priority 6

Lastly, we realize none of this is possible if we are not good stewards of our resources. As such, we will both explore new sources of revenue and carefully examine the financial feasibility of existing programs and initiatives, thereby securing a financially sustainable future in which Bellarmine will flourish.

The Path Forward

Strategic Priority 1

At the very core of Bellarmine’s mission and institutional identity is our enduring commitment to a quality education. Rooted in the rich tradition of the liberal arts and sciences while also offering opportunities to acquire knowledge in professional fields, a Bellarmine education prepares students for lives of meaning and value.

Strategic Priority 2

As proud as we are of this transformative student experience, we recognize that we need to transform ourselves as well, adapting and innovating to meet the needs of 21st-century learners. We thus look to a future in which Bellarmine will embrace new technologies, pedagogies, and ideas, changing the education we provide and how we provide it in order to better equip our students for a rapidly changing world.

Strategic Priority 3

We also recognize that we must transform ourselves by expanding and diversifying our student population and geographic reach so that more people from more places and backgrounds can receive the benefit of a Bellarmine education; and that, once we attract new diverse populations to campus, we must put in place support systems for their success.

Strategic Priority 4

This emphasis on equity and inclusion extends to our larger Bellarmine community as well. We are dedicated to fostering an institutional environment with faculty and staff who are representative of the diversity and vibrancy of Louisville and the region.

Strategic Priority 5

We are likewise committed to strengthening our connection to the city, state, and region of which we are a part by seeking out new avenues for partnership and collaboration.

Strategic Priority 6

Lastly, we realize none of this is possible if we are not good stewards of our resources. As such, we will both explore new sources of revenue and carefully examine the financial feasibility of existing programs and initiatives, thereby securing a financially sustainable future in which Bellarmine will flourish.

Strategic Priority 1:

Maintain and Enhance Our Ability to Deliver a Transformative Student Experience

Like a number of liberal arts colleges and universities today, Bellarmine faces many challenges. Over the past decade the stagnation in the number of U.S. high school graduates has led to decreasing enrollment at colleges and universities across the nation.

Bellarmine has a well-deserved reputation for academic excellence. From its founding, Bellarmine has provided its students with an education rooted in the rich tradition of the Catholic liberal arts and sciences, a broad-based curriculum that eschews narrow specialization and instead prepares graduates to be lifelong learners and ethical decision-makers who can apply their knowledge in a range of contexts and adapt to changing circumstances. In the years since, Bellarmine has strengthened and diversified its educational offerings by adding new undergraduate majors and programs, as well as professional schools and graduate degrees in fields such as business, education, communication, and the health professions.

Although we remain convinced of the value of our liberal arts core and our high-quality professional schools, we also realize that students’ needs and expectations have changed. Thus, in addition to renewing our commitment to the liberal arts and building upon the values of Thomas Merton, we must both reimagine and better communicate to our 21st-century students what a Bellarmine education is and why it matters. 

In order to improve retention at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, we will develop individualized pathways for success for each student, and will work to strengthen graduate student culture and community while exploring the possibility of new graduate programs. We will provide more support for students as they transition to their careers and lives after Bellarmine, equipping them with the tools they need to put what they have learned in the classroom into action. We will also look to enhance campus life more generally, creating inclusive learning environments, and expanding our mission to educate the whole person to include a more explicit emphasis on health and wellness. 

Students lining up for the march into Freedom Hall

Additionally, we will incorporate into our courses and curricula whenever possible what the Association of American Colleges and Universities has identified as high-impact practices. That includes, but is not limited to, a robust first-year and other common intellectual experiences; increased opportunities for collaborative and global learning; writing-intensive courses, internships, undergraduate research, and capstone projects that invite students to integrate and apply their learning to real-world issues and problems. 

Strategic Priority 2:

Become a Model for Academic Innovation

Much of Bellarmine’s historical success can be attributed to its focus on excellence in the classroom. Our small class sizes and faculty-to-student ratio promote individualized attention and mentorship, which in turn provide our students with greater opportunities for personal and intellectual growth. We know that education is not simply about acquiring information, but rather learning how to learn, a process that our faculty facilitate by fostering classroom environments guided by reasoned inquiry and discussion.

As much as we value the classroom experience at Bellarmine, we know that we must diversify our educational delivery in order to adapt to changing circumstances and provide more students access to a high-quality Bellarmine education. With this goal in mind, we propose to create a center for innovative pedagogy and purposeful risk-taking, and to seek out ways to encourage faculty and staff to disrupt traditional boundaries and collaborate across disciplines and departments. 

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We will experiment with new and emerging technologies—including online and hybrid courses—not as ends in themselves, but as means to expand access and augment our traditional strengths. Crucially, we will also focus much greater attention on continuing education, engaging the community and tailoring our offerings to meet professional needs and address relevant issues. We will thus, for example, explore offering new certificates and other meaningful credentials that meet community and professional needs but might not fit within the current structure of our existing undergraduate and graduate degrees. 

 

Strategic Priority 3:

Expand and Diversify Our Enrollment and Geographic Reach

Bellarmine has seen dramatic growth over the past fifteen years. The school has added significant enrollment, campus facilities, academic programs, and faculty. However, the higher education landscape is changing fast and the past three years have seen flat enrollment numbers. 

The challenges facing colleges and universities today are many: an aversion to student debt following the recent recession, competition from online programs, declining government investment, population shifts, and an overall declining market. These roadblocks have forced colleges to scramble to meet enrollment goals. Meanwhile, the liberal arts are under attack in the public forum, despite vast evidence that liberal arts students earn more than their peers over time. 

The demographics facing Bellarmine’s future enrollment numbers are clear. Our region expects a 10 percent drop in the number of high school graduates by 2025, meaning we will have to compete for a shrinking overall prospect pool. Those prospects are job-outcome focused, are prone to tuition sticker shock, and are wary of student debt. 


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At Bellarmine, we see this as an opportunity. We must be highly strategic in growing our enrollment. In the course of doing so, we will expand our geographic reach and diversify our student populations. To meet this strategic goal we will develop a comprehensive enrollment plan, opening new markets and engaging more diverse student populations. We will also take full advantage of the ability of our outstanding athletics programs to raise our profile regionally and nationally, including an evaluation of our division and conference. And we will empower our influential alumni community to act as our ambassadors via their worldwide networks. 

Strategic Priority 4:

Commitment to Equity and Inclusion

Bellarmine is committed to core values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. According to the American Association of Colleges and Universities, genuine inclusion involves intentionally bringing together diverse groups that are actively connected and engaged around issues of equitable access and social justice. Inclusion requires developing an active and just community that is knowledgeable, respectful, and engaged with the richness of differing cultures, perspectives, and epistemologies.

Bellarmine is committed to welcoming diverse students, staff, and faculty to an inclusive community. However, given inflection points in our culture, we must continue to strengthen support for the diversity of students, faculty, and staff we attract. To develop meaningful inclusion and engagement, we must expand our principles of hospitality to cultivate a true sense of belonging, beyond just being present, so that everyone sees that Bellarmine is a place for them.

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As we remain committed to advancing equity and a diverse and inclusive academic environment, we also recognize the need to shape a distinct community reflecting our urban environment. Reaffirming Thomas Merton’s values of inclusion and compassion, we must foster critical dialogues, informed collaborative engagement, and transformative teaching. The newly formed President’s Advisory Board on Equity and Inclusion, partnering with the Provost’s Office and the Office of Identity and Inclusion, and in alliance with the Bellarmine community, will engage in transformative initiatives that reflect our core values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Understanding that theory informs practice and that diversity is central to academic excellence, we will work to recruit and retain a diverse student body and develop and expand curricular initiatives to prepare students for our increasingly diverse and global culture. Working to improve the climate for work and study at Bellarmine, we will also examine and propose bold new policies and practices related to recruitment, retention, career pathways, orientation, and training for diverse students, faculty, and staff members.

 

Strategic Priority 5:

Engage in Mutually Beneficial Partnerships in Louisville and the Region

Over the years, Bellarmine has enjoyed many valuable partnerships with local businesses, corporations, and nonprofits. Our Board is also well represented with members from corporations, local businesses, and community organizations. In order to expand learning opportunities and strengthen career pathways for students, we must continue to expand the number of community-based partnerships and coalitions.

Fitting our Catholic social justice mission, our responsibility to our community involves building an intentional, visible, symbiotic relationship with the city. By connecting the campus, the community, and the curriculum through engaged scholarship and action, we will enhance social and civic engagement, including faculty and student-led initiatives, with an eye toward enhancing career development and increasing alumni involvement. Through a range of feasibility studies and innovative practices, we will work to promote effective collaborations, community engagement, and strategic partnerships between the university, alumni, and Louisville-area businesses.

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Strategic Priority 6:

Expand our Commitment to Access and Affordability

At Bellarmine, we take great pride in the economic stewardship of our university’s resources. Since our founding, we have weathered many hardships and emerged each time stronger than ever. In the absence of the billion-dollar endowments and state funding that many colleges enjoy, Bellarmine will likely remain dependent on tuition revenue and support from alumni and friends for the foreseeable future.

Managing the operations of a complex organization like a modern university is a thorny endeavor. Further complicating this challenge is the fast-changing nature of higher education today. There are wolves at the door: fierce competition for a shrinking prospect pool; the rapid adoption of online programs; tuition sticker shock; student and parent resistance to debt; marketplace shifts in program viability; governmental, regulatory, and accreditation challenges; and technology’s encroachment into the future of jobs.

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At Bellarmine, we relish the opportunity to think and act creatively in the face of these challenges. We understand that to flourish today and well into the future, we must meet the market wherever it goes. That means we will understand the marketplace in the moment and anticipate its changes over time. We will make Bellarmine accessible to students of all backgrounds, which is both financially astute and true to our founding mission. 

Further, every academic and administrative program must pull its weight. We will anticipate market trends and take advantage of data analytics to form a keen understanding of the viability of majors and programs, beefing up successful programs and eliminating or altering ones that aren’t attracting students. We will also take a hard look at our pricing model, striking a precise balance between affordability and revenue. And we will think outside the box about alternative revenue streams and new delivery models, including corporate partnerships, fundraising, tuition subsidies, and our communications about the unique Bellarmine value proposition and its real-world outcomes.

 

Putting the Plan into Action

Any strategic plan is only as good as its architects’ determination to put it into action and its community’s embrace and acceptance. Now comes the hard work of making the plan a reality. Underlying the plan outlined here is a broad analysis of the costs and other challenges that we must overcome in order to achieve the plan’s goals. That analysis, which we will continually reassess, will help us set priorities over time. 

The president and her senior leadership team will direct the implementation of the strategic priorities in the coming months. Collaboration between the leadership team, deans, faculty, staff, students, and the Board of Trustees, as well as our many alumni and friends, will be necessary to ensure a successful implementation of the strategic plan. 

The president will report annually to the Bellarmine community based on an assessment of progress toward key performance indicators. To keep up to date on our progress, please visit the strategic plan website at bellarmine.edu/strategic-plan.



Steering Committee Members

Sean Ryan, Senior Vice President, Co-Chair

Nancy York, Dean of Lansing School of Nursing and Clinical Sciences, Co-Chair

Angela Rone, Director of University Initiatives, Project Manager

Claudette Berry, Sr. Administrative Assistant, Office of Enrollment Management, Project Coordinator

Shawn Apostel, Assistant Professor, Communication

Jonathan Blandford, Director, Honors Program

Rick Brown, Director, International & Veterans Initiatives

Kate Bulinski, Associate Professor, Environmental Studies

Denise Brown-Cornelius, Assistant Vice President, Business Affairs

Melanie Brunsdon, Assistant Director of Athletics for Compliance, Athletics

Elizabeth Cassady, Assistant Dean of Students, Student Affairs

Adam Elias, Director of Innovative Learning Systems, Academic Affairs

Patrick Englert, Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs

Christopher Golden, Grounds/UTeam Member, Facilities Management

Barb Jackson, Assistant Professor, Graduate Nursing

Kate Johnson, Assistant Professor, Philosophy

Keith Knapp, Associate Professor, Health Services and Senior Living Leadership

Lindsey Peetz-Murray, Development Advisor, Pioneer Program, Student Success Center

Ian Patrick, Assistant Vice President, Office of Development & Alumni Relations

Sara Pettingill, Dean of Graduate Admission, Graduate Admission Office

Annette Powell, Associate Professor, English

Keith Richardson, Professor of Accounting, School of Business

Eric Satterly, Vice Provost for Information Technology, Academic Affairs

Grant Smith, Assistant Professor Education, Doctorate Program, School of Education

James Standard, Senior Undergraduate Admission Counselor, Undergraduate Admission Office

Jim Welp, Assistant Vice President, Office of Communications and Public Affairs

Mark Wiegand, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, Office of Academic Affairs

Steven Wilt, Associate Professor, Biology

Chris Wingard, Professor, Physical Therapy

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