Conference Workshops

Session I: 9:30 - 10:20 a.m.

Walking In Their Shoes

Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Action oriented workshop.

Location: Miles 234

Presenter: Kathleen Cooter, Professor, Bellarmine University

Abstract: Using a game format, walk in the shoes of person in poverty circumstances. You assume an identity, join a group of five other players and throw the dice to discover your next life adventure. Based on research and real circumstances, the game invites you into the daily stresses and realities of a person in poverty circumstances.

Understanding Why Everybody is Bias!

Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Action oriented workshop.

Location: Hilary's

Presenter: LaNeeca Williams, Diversity and Equity Officer, University of Evansville

Abstract: This presentation will help attendees to understand various ways you can gain some understanding and develop insight into student bias. No matter the campus climate our students all have a bias of some kind which is directing their intentions. Biases can be positive or negative and influence how we act and interact with other people and events. Students create biases in their minds using the same process for both mild biases and severe ones, which can often appear as blatant or micro-aggressive behaviors. Helping students to become more aware of how to overcome unconscious and hidden biases is trending at universities today. Indeed, biases change often for students but understanding and being aware that they exist is important. The presentation will offer several ways to promote courageous conversations and events that highlight difficult issues, like buried prejudices and biases in order to help students understand why everybody is bias.

Mentoring: An Unconventional Approach to Addressing Multiple Dimensions of Diversity

Best practices / current research in diversity, inclusion and / or social justice. Roundtable Discussion.

Location: Miles 123

Presenter: Jordan Wiehebrink, Senior Graduate Admission Officer, Bellarmine University

Abstract: While the benefits of having a mentor have long been supported, more recent research suggests mentoring relationships as being mutually beneficial. Such relationships can exists in multiple capacities and form for various purposes. More recently, however, mentoring relationships have been identified as an unconventional, yet effective approach to different dimensions of diversity. By being more intentional about the integration of mentoring relationships, practitioners can be more proactive about addressing multi-dimensional diversity within various contexts.

Let Them Eat Pie: An Exercise for Promoting Equity

Diversity based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Action oriented workshops. Interactive Lecture.

Location: Frazier Hall

Presenters: Erlene Grise-Owens, Professor and MSW Director School of Social Work, Spalding University
Mindy Eaves, School of Social Work, Spalding University.
Laura Escobar-Ratliff, Instructor, School of Social Work, Spalding University

Abstract: Hungry for ideas on promoting equitable work, school, and social cultures? This “eat-eractive” workshop uses pie as a metaphor for power. A pie-eating exercise feeds dialogue and discussion of core concepts and questions. Topics include: (1) pie-power, privilege, (surplus) powerlessness; (2) advocacy—collaborative, competitive, adversarial; (3) just pieces, production, distribution, and so forth; (4) false “pie-ty” vs. pie-parity; (5) individual, corporate, global connections; (6) pie assumptions, values, policies, actions; (7) pie (power)-paradigms: changing pie—even as we eat it? We discuss ways to expand application in various contexts. Pre-requisite: BYOB—Bring your own brain; we will bring the pie!

How Coyote Lost His Eyes: Toward American Indian Rhetorics

Best practices / current research in diversity, inclusion and/or social justice. Interactive Lecture.

Location: Fireplace Room

Presenter: Jennie Wellman, Writing Center Director, Bellarmine University

Abstract: It is not enough to look through the theoretical lenses we use to think through ways of making and enhancing writing center pedagogy. It leads to assumptions about there being one natural and universal way of seeing issues that surround the academy. These assumptions are often stuck in the binary of either/or. Victor Villanueva urges scholars to move toward inhabiting the interstitial to think through new ways of seeing. By using the American Indian trickster tale of How Coyote Lost His Eyes, the purpose of my project works to explore how we can follow Coyote’s lead, to lose our eyes and gain new perspectives on how to become better anti-racist, anti-xenophobic, and anti-homophobic accomplices. I argue that we must look at the very theoretical lenses themselves to unearth underlying assumptions that might be lost upon first view.

Session II: 10:30 - 11:20 a.m.

Walking In Their Shoes (Continued)

Location: Miles 234

Track: Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace.

Format: Action oriented workshop

Understanding Why Everybody is Bias! (Continued)

Location: Hilary’s

Track: Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace.

Format: Action oriented workshop

Diversifying the Leadership Pipeline through Intentionality

Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Roundtable.

Location: Frazier

Presenters: Raylene Pollio, Diversity & Inclusion Manager, Brown-Forman Corporation
La Toya McClellan, Regional People Development Consulting Manager, Brown-Forman Corporation

Abstract: During this session, the presenters will share learnings from two leadership development programs that Brown-Forman offers to accelerate the careers of Black, Latino, Asian, and female high potential employees. The presenters will share the journey that Brown-Forman has been on and engage the session participants in a dialogue about what they are noticing and/or doing in their respective organizations.

Creating and Customizing Inclusiveness in the Field of Education

Overview of diversity, inclusion and/or social justice in business, education, health, international affairs, media, religion and politics. Interactive Lecture

Location: Fireplace Room

Presenter: Candace Lamb, Assistant Director, Career Development Center

Abstract: This program will draw upon the Career Development's initiative to create customized career programming for diverse student populations to provide student affairs professionals with ways to incorporate targeted programming for these populations into their events and programs. This presentation will discuss researching benchmark institutions, partnering with other offices to better understand student needs, and how to gain student buy in for these initiatives.

Exercise, Recovery Program Adherence, and Health Outcomes in Homeless Men

Best practices / current research in diversity, inclusion and/or social justice. Interactive Lecture

Location: Miles 123

Presenter: Chelsey Franz, Assistant Professor, Bellarmine University

Abstract: Over 8 million Americans are dependent on illicit drugs. These numbers are higher among homeless individuals. The homeless populations suffer disproportionately from poor health. The LifeChange program is an addiction recovery program designed for homeless men. Adherence to the program is less than 50% [4], yet research shows that men who successfully complete addiction recovery programs are more likely to have stable housing, maintain drug/alcohol abstinence a year after graduating from the program, and report improved health and quality of life outcomes [1, 5]. Costs associated with homelessness could be reduced with improved adherence to addiction recovery programs. Maintaining sobriety, improving health outcomes and transitioning back to society are best achieved with completion of an addiction recovery program, yet adherence falls below 50% [1-3]. Thus, interventions designed to improve addiction recovery program adherence are needed.

Session III: 1:30 - 2:20 p.m.

NEVER Say Never!

Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Action oriented workshops. Action oriented workshop

Location: GBCH 230

Presenter: Marian Vasser, Coordinator for A&S Diversity Programs, University of Louisville

Abstract: We’ve all compiled a list of things we would “never” do, and causing harm to others is usually at the top of the list. Afterall, most of us were raised to love and respect everyone, right? During this interactive session, participants will explore the effects of well-intentioned messages that may actually cause others harm and leave them feeling excluded. Perhaps you were raised on the Golden Rule, which states, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you". What happens when our "doing unto" is misunderstood or rejected? What happens when others are seemingly offended by every little thing we do? Ever considered the countless recordings and early messages we acquire over time and how they inform our interactions with other? Bring your shovel (willingness to be open, honest, and transparent) and let’s dig up roots together!

Thinking Intersectionally: How Complex Identities Shape Experience

Best practices / current research in diversity, inclusion and/or social justice. Action oriented workshop

Location: Hilary’s

Presenters: Danielle Alexander, Therapy Intern, Bellarmine University
Gary Petiprin, Licensed Psychologist, Bellarmine University

Abstract: Have you ever noticed how people from the same demographic can have wildly different lived experiences? Have you ever wondered how people manage or make sense of multiple identities? “Intersectionality” is a term used in social justice literature to describe the ways in which people’s many different identities work together to situate them within unique social locations. These unique sets of identities create a compilation of privileged and oppressed experiences that color how one walks through the world. Through accounting for and understanding these unique mixtures of privilege and oppression, we can better understand the true diversity represented in our organizations and advocate for a more equitable institution.

Interfaith is Who We Are

Best practices / current research in diversity, inclusion and/or social justice. Roundtable Discussion

Location: GBCH 232

Presenter: Melanie-Prejean Sullivan, Director of Campus Ministry, Bellarmine University

Abstract: On University campuses, rather than speaking about "doing" interfaith work, we need to tell our story to our newest members to bring them into our saga which enthusiastically declares that interfaith is our identity, a part of our religious DNA, ingrained in what Thomas Merton called, the "true self." This presentation will feature speakers active in the Louisville interfaith community in conversation with staff of Bellarmine University telling their story about 60 years of partnership.

Shadows in the Threshold: Collecting Accounts of Black Students Transitioning from Writing in High School to a Predominantly White Research University

Overview of diversity, inclusion and/or social justice in business, education, health, international affairs, media, religion and politics. Interactive Lecture

Location: Fireplace Room

Presenter: Jamila Kareem, PhD Candidate, University of Louisville

Abstract: For new first-year students of color at this university, navigating such an ambiguous racial climate can create more uncertainty than usual about their place in this community. As writing remains a primary means for students to perform academic identity, this presentation describes the accounts about transitioning to college-level writing from first-year and upper division Black students at this institution. The six accounts which will be presented were collected through semi-structured interviews and provide telling, unexplored perspectives on how racial identity might shape transitional experiences in educational environments. In describing the accounts of how these students from a socially subjugated racial position explain their movements across the high school to college writing threshold, this presentation offers one way to examine how racial identity migrates through academic settings where race occupies an absent presence.

Increasing LGBTQ Inclusivity for Staff and Clients

Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Interactive Lecture

Location: GBCH 234

Presenter: Patrie Garbrough, Graduate Student, Spaulding University

Abstract: In an increasingly diverse world, it's important for businesses and organizations to maintain and inclusive environment for both staff and clients. The LGBTQ community has a unique set of workplace needs, including proving facilities for transgender and gender nonconforming individuals, appropriate language for documentation, and policies that are inclusive to people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. The purpose of this presentation is to inform others about the needs of the LGBTQ community and develop inclusive environments for employees and clients.

Session IV: 2:30 - 3:20 p.m.

NEVER Say Never! (Continued)

Location: GBCH 230

Track: Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Action oriented workshops

Format: Action oriented workshop

Thinking Intersectionally: How Complex Identities Shape Experience (Continued)

Location: Hilary’s

Track: Best practices / current research in diversity, inclusion and/or social justice

Format: Action oriented workshop

Isms are Everywhere: A “Mallisms” Exercise

Diversity based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Interactive Lecture

Location: GBCH234

Presenters: Erlene Grise-Owens, Professor and MSW Director School of Social Work, Spalding University
Laura Escobar-Ratliff, Instructor, School of Social Work, Spalding University

Abstract: This workshop will describe an activity that we (the presenters) have been incorporating in a social work practice course for many years. This activity raises awareness about the ubiquity and subtle nature of “isms” (racism, sexism, etc.) In the practice course, students go to malls and other public places to find evidence of isms and counters to those isms; they also consider media and other aspects of everyday life, including their workplaces. Then, they report on their findings in class poster presentations. Because this exercise involves active engagement and group exploration, dialogue is encouraged and the impact is magnified. We will adapt the exercise for an experiential component in the workshop; discuss the impact of the exercise; and consider how to replicate this exercise in various contexts to raise awareness of the impact of isms.

Cultural Competency: The Cross Section of Free, Oppressive and Inclusive Speech

Diversity, inclusion and/or social justice based techniques that can be utilized in the workplace. Interactive Lecture

Location: GBCH 232

Presenters: Dr. Michael Mardis, Dean of Students and Vice Provost for Student Affairs, University of Louisville
Tierney Bates, Cultural Center Director, University of Louisville

Abstract: We are facing a time when speech, rhetoric, and action is confronting the historical context of race on campuses. The rise in tension on college campuses around race, expression, and intolerance can lead to hostile environments. Student Affairs practitioners play a critical role in creating opportunities for learning, while balancing freedom of expression with an inclusive, and respectful environment that values all people. The work we do is vital to the institution, community and student body. This dialogue will help create and understanding and methods for respecting differences, equity, and freedom of expression.